Guest Blog: Celebrating the accomplishments of successful individuals age 50+

 

 

By Ann Hossack and Marylou Hilliard

What do Cher, Steven Spielberg and William J. Clinton have in common? They are among the first baby boomers to turn 70 during 2017. Unlike previous generations who saw milestones such as retirement or turning 70 as indicators they were approaching the end of their life; today’s boomers are vibrant, engaged and continue to make positive contributions in their professions and to society.

According to The Globe & Mail – “The Boomer Shift – January 5, 2017, “As of this year, for the first time, Canada has more people over the age of 65 than under 15. The age group that now encompasses the boomer generation – 50 to 69 – makes up 27 per cent of the population, compared with 18 per cent in that age group two decades ago”.

This aging population is changing the fabric of society; so why is it that society is still obsessed with youth – just think about all those Top 30 under 30 and top 40 over 40 lists. Traditionally, innovation and “change-making” has primarily been recognized to be within the sphere of the young.

However, individuals who are mid-life aged and beyond represent an incredible source of talent, experience and wisdom that provides them the opportunity to make a difference in their lives and to the world. They have a desire to follow their passions, fulfill lifelong dreams and improve the future for generations to come. Moreover they are among the largest group of individuals to keep philanthropic efforts and volunteerism, which are critical to societal progress alive and well.

That’s why AGEWORKS has chosen to publicly acknowledge successful accomplishments of people aged 50+; to raise awareness for this inequity and to demonstrate that older people offer a variety of innovative solutions to an array of important societal issues.

The AGEWORKS Top 50 Over 50 Awards celebrate Canadians who know who to dream, create, contribute and achieve in many different areas. Winners will be acknowledged at the inaugural Top 50 Over 50 Awards Gala being held in Toronto in November 2017.

The recipients, and their stories, will serve as inspiration to others with a message that you’re never too old to make significant changes in your career or your life via reinvention, pursue a long-held dream or redefine what it means to be successful. These amazing stories will be publicly leveraged to help combat some of the ageism myths, like over 50 means over the hill, that still exist.

Success will be measured on a variety of criteria, including finding purpose, social change, innovation and inspiring others, by a panel of independent judges who have significant expertise and involvement within the 50+ category. Selected judges recognize the importance of these awards and will bring their objectivity and enthusiasm to this essential role.

For more information or to nominate someone go to:  http://www.ageworks.co

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Marylou Hilliard has over 25 years of advertising expertise and has earned a reputation as a brand champion. She has worked with a broad range of clients targeting an “ageing population” including the development of a new brand identity and design of several research reports for International Federation on Ageing and volunteer work for the Consumers Council of Canada and Psychologist Foundation of Canada.

Ann Hossack has held senior database marketing roles and has communicated effectively to consumer and business-to-business markets including those 50+ across a wide variety of industries. She believes that companies have yet to fully embrace this target group and is determined to promote the value of 50+ individuals as employees, entrepreneurs, volunteers or consumers.

Guest Blog: Interdepartmental Communication in Long-term Care

By Sarah Murray

While completing my Bachelor of Social Work from Wilfrid Laurier University, I had the opportunity to do my placement at the Sheridan Centre for Elder Research and a long-term care home. While I was at placement, I observed different types of communication between staff and residents. Doing so made me aware of how important effective communication is when working in these settings; this communication is verbal, non-verbal and written. Some barriers to communication in long-term care settings are lack of time to communicate, language barriers, disabilities and cognitive impairments. Communication in long-term care homes is essential to create a positive work environment for the staff and residents.

The nature of long-term care makes it hard for effective communication to take place; most workers are swarmed with work and have to manage a large caseload of residents. The residents of these homes all have their own unique individual needs that need to be addressed; there is no one solution when working with individuals who have cognitive impairments. Benefits of effective communication in the work place include; employee satisfaction, greater staff efficiency, and result in a positive team environment for both the staff and the residents of the home. There are also risks associated with poor communication; these include staff burnout, low staff morale, negative work environment and unmet needs of residents. When the resident’s needs are unmet it can create another wave of communication breakdown, due to responsive behaviors associated with unmet needs in dementia patients. These events can also intensify staff burnout and make the work environment less desirable.

Tips for communication for residents with Dementia (from the Alzheimer Society of Ontario):

  • Introduce yourself, instead of assuming the patient remembers you.
  • Be calm, friendly and communicate at their pace. (Sometimes vocalizing words is difficult for dementia patients, give them the time to pronounce the word)
  • Give instructions once at a time rather then all at once, and wait for a response
  • Maintain engaging open body language (crossed arms may indicate you are angry or annoyed)
  • If the resident repeats themselves, do not tell them so; instead act like it is the first time your hearing it
  • Never say “Don’t you remember” or correct their ideas
  • Do not change the tone of your voice when speaking to individuals with dementia and avoid baby talk

In 2010, 35.6 million people worldwide were living with dementia, a number that is expected to double in 20 years. (Statistics Canada, 2016) Hospitals and long-term care homes and community organizations will have their hands full to provide care to this aging demographic. The first skill needed to positively deal with this demand is communication, if this is done correctly many older adults and their families will benefit, as well as staff employed to work with this population.

When communication is perfect on every level, it creates an environment of trust and respect that allows people to maintain a sense of dignity and pride.
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Sarah Murray completed her placement at the Centre for Elder Research while achieving her Bachelor of Social Work from Wilfrid Laurier University.

Wong, S. Gilmour, H. Ramage-Morin, P. (2016) Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias in Canada. Statistics Canada.
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-003-x/2016005/article/14613-eng.htm

Guest Blog: Entrepreneurship in Later Life, When Markets Are Ripe

By Mark Venning

Entrepreneurship in later life. At the risk of being prescriptive by way of writing a textbook definition of this venture, or you might say – adventure, I did learn early on that this movement would have legs as time went on. Gathering evidence of this, working directly in the front lines of the career development field since the mid-90’s, with a focus on entrepreneurship, it has been a privilege to help and encourage others to fulfill their goals while at the same time being realistic with people about keeping a healthy perspective on the challenges – reality bites as it were.

Let us not over inflate the trend bubble on this, the notion that suggests that legions of people over age 50 are breaking free to start and run a business, for it is not all it will turn out to be. From what I have observed, working with clients exploring this option, and for those who do it, the journey is often episodic in nature, and in addition to that, there are multiple variations of how people actually describe, design and construct their entrepreneurial story.

We must begin this discussion with understanding the motivations. Why do people in this rather large age zone (over 50), even want to consider this? As I often ask first, where are you on a scale from being – 1 (curious) to 5 (exploring) to 10 (real intent)? Not surprisingly, given the profile segmentations of the over 50’s, the responses tend to land somewhere in the middle.

What are those motivations?

Depending on the person’s situation at a given life stage, more than the actual age itself, the top responses are variations on three lines of thought:

  • can’t afford to retire, need/desire to supplement financial plans with earned income
  • too young to retire, need/desire to stay challenged or engaged
  • be my own boss, want flexibility, tired of working in the corporate environment

However, behind these statements, quite often there is a harboured wish to continue to look for a traditional job, hence the episodic nature of some entrepreneurial ventures. For example, it is not untypical for those who take the route of independent consulting to take on a full time position offered by a business client, and after a few years wander back to independence.

Probing people further in conversation, it turns out in many cases, that the word entrepreneurship sits very weighty on their minds, but when you turn it into a discussion of possibilities around “a range of self-employment options”, the explorer becomes more open minded.

What are those possibilities?

To start, I am keen to find out what ideas people already have in their heads. Sometimes several, though not always fully developed, these ideas fall under three general categories:

  • market my own expertise as an independent consultant or contractor
  • start a home based, web based business – product, service or craft
  • start a business or buy a franchise, build it to sell in a number of years

With the next two-part question: what is your specific business idea and to what extent have you determined that there is an obtainable market for it? …the answer is, “it’s a work in progress”.

Is there an obtainable market for you? That is a pretzel shaped question. On one twist, what differentiation, value and relevance to you bring to a given market, and the other twist is, what is the gap or unmet need in a market that you know you can serve?

While in discussions stemming from this question, I find that there are those who have little patience for the market research process and an under estimation of the ramp up period or timelines to get a business off and running. This is also accompanied by an under estimated realization that continuous life transitions as we age will require frequent recalibrations of business and personal goals.

Now there is another way forward where the possibilities can be several, simultaneously or sequentially, lived in the form of a portfolio of income streams. Interest or intent increases here as most people I have met, “explorers” of entrepreneurship in later life, have seen the merit in this model, because it can be modified over a longer period of later life stages. In that sense, this is a flexible, fluid from of self-employment, regenerative in process.

Enterprisers at any age

To re-frame this picture of entrepreneurship over the next decade, at whatever age we are, as market needs shift and traditional employment systems continue to reconstruct, it will require the curious, creative and collaborative mind-set of an enterpriser. We are all next decade enterprisers, and in a human service economy, there will be more need for social enterprisers at the same time as a renaissance for micro businesses, networked alliances & independent wide achievers, who like a da Vinci, learn to re-apply their talents to where the work meets the need.

Often spiffed up for marketing purposes by language like “seniorpreneur” or “boomerprenur”, we should note, that while entrepreneurial activity may have increased in this over 50 age group, the overall self-employment rate in Canada over the last several years has stayed constant at around 15.5 percent. At the same time with the continuum of demographic shifts in mind, the so named “generation X” is now entering their early 50’s and I don’t think they see themselves as seniors.

As we move into the next decade there is no reason to suspect that the exploration or intent level will diminish when it comes to entrepreneurship in later life, but two things will need to happen.

First, a healthier resource system to educate and support people will need to surface, one that demystifies the concept of entrepreneurship and makes it less about age and more about marketability. Second, more research is needed to understand the motivations, options, patterns and cycles of entrepreneurship or self-employment over a person’s life course.

__________________________________________________________________________________ Mark Venning works primarily with non-profit & business leaders offering insights and direction on the Business & Social Aspects of Aging Demographics and helps organizations adapt their thinking to meet the challenges of “recoding a longevity society” which include designing age inclusive communities and creating opportunities for inter-generational collaboration with an enterprising mind-set. www.changerangers.com

Pilot Dance Project Explores The Benefits of Dance Participation

The Centre for Elder Research is conducting a pilot project that explores the benefits of dance participation for individuals experiencing multiple chronic health conditions. Older adults are invited to participate in 12 weeks (two days a week) of complimentary dance classes. The classes will be led by a dance professional who will be providing modified instruction such as seated dancing.

In order to be eligible to participate in the dance program, the older adults must be 65 years of age and older. Both men and women are welcome! Participants must also be experiencing mobility issues and at least two other chronic health conditions.

Classes will run on Tuesday and Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., starting Tuesday, April 4 and running until Thursday, June 22.

If you would like to know more about this program or to register for the classes, contact Kate Dupuis at 905-845-9430 extension 4229 or email Kate at kate.dupuis@sheridancollege.ca

See flyer for further details.