Guest Blog: Dancing through life: Participation in a dance training program for community-based older adults with multiple medical comorbidities issues

By Kate Dupuis

Dance is one of the oldest art forms, with depictions of dancers dating back over 30,000 years. Even if we think that we have “two left feet”, when a favourite song comes on the radio, it is hard not to tap our toes or dance along in our seats. Throughout our lifespan, dance can help us to connect with others, express our emotions, and strengthen our bodies. Indeed, dance has many potential benefits as we age. Research has shown that, as we age, dance can benefit cognitive health (for example, improvements in memory and processing speed when remembering fancy footwork during ballroom dancing, or trying to keep up with the caller’s instructions when square dancing), physical health (increased strength, mobility, flexibility, and balance), mental well-being (reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression), and social well-being (developing connections with others through dance, making new friends, getting to know the instructor). The physical benefits of dance may be particularly crucial for those older adults with mobility issues who may be at a heightened risk of falls. While many communities offer dance programs, these may not account for or provide accommodations for individuals who are experiencing multiple medical comorbidities, including mobility challenges.

At the Sheridan Centre for Elder Research, we are currently conducting a research study in which community-dwelling older adults with mobility issues and at least two other medical comorbidities (e.g., high blood pressure, vision loss) are participating in 12 weeks of twice-weekly dance instruction. The sessions are led by a professionally-trained dance instructor, who has taken the time to understand each participant’s strengths and challenges, and makes specific accommodations for each of the dancers depending on their needs. We spoke with Pat Spadafora, the Director of the Sheridan Centre for Elder Research, who said that “the decision was made to hire a professionally-trained dancer in order to capitalize on the extensive repertoire of material from her own training and performances which she can draw upon for inspiration and instruction during the sessions. In addition, professionally-trained dancers understand the biomechanics and anatomy involved in dance, which results in these teachers being able to make a wide variety of accommodations for their participants.” These accommodations are necessary and welcome for our participants.

The dance instructor, Paula Skimin, reports that she has seen remarkable improvements in the participants over the course of the program, including improvements in balance, stability, and “developing a knowledge of their skeleton and skeletal structure, which allows for more stability.” She stated that, from a social perspective, the participants have become comfortable sharing with one another, and that many have cried during class when specific songs have touched them. She has worked to “create a safe space where people feel comfortable to express themselves and to share about their past, present, and future.”

At the end of the 12 weeks, the researcher will meet with each of the participants individually to discuss their perspective on the program. Many of them have already expressed a desire to continue with their dancing. We hope that, with new evidence to support the provision of dance training for individuals with multiple medical comorbidities, we will be able to offer similar programs in the future!

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Kate Dupuis is the new Schlegel Innovation Leader in Arts and Aging at Sheridan College. She studies how participation in the creative and performing arts can serve to enhance the wellbeing of older adults. In particular, Kate is interested in discovering the personal characteristics of individuals who are drawn to participate in the arts, and identifying the physical, psychological, social, and systemic barriers to participation.

Guest Blog: Celebrating the accomplishments of successful individuals age 50+

 

 

By Ann Hossack and Marylou Hilliard

What do Cher, Steven Spielberg and William J. Clinton have in common? They are among the first baby boomers to turn 70 during 2017. Unlike previous generations who saw milestones such as retirement or turning 70 as indicators they were approaching the end of their life; today’s boomers are vibrant, engaged and continue to make positive contributions in their professions and to society.

According to The Globe & Mail – “The Boomer Shift – January 5, 2017, “As of this year, for the first time, Canada has more people over the age of 65 than under 15. The age group that now encompasses the boomer generation – 50 to 69 – makes up 27 per cent of the population, compared with 18 per cent in that age group two decades ago”.

This aging population is changing the fabric of society; so why is it that society is still obsessed with youth – just think about all those Top 30 under 30 and top 40 over 40 lists. Traditionally, innovation and “change-making” has primarily been recognized to be within the sphere of the young.

However, individuals who are mid-life aged and beyond represent an incredible source of talent, experience and wisdom that provides them the opportunity to make a difference in their lives and to the world. They have a desire to follow their passions, fulfill lifelong dreams and improve the future for generations to come. Moreover they are among the largest group of individuals to keep philanthropic efforts and volunteerism, which are critical to societal progress alive and well.

That’s why AGEWORKS has chosen to publicly acknowledge successful accomplishments of people aged 50+; to raise awareness for this inequity and to demonstrate that older people offer a variety of innovative solutions to an array of important societal issues.

The AGEWORKS Top 50 Over 50 Awards celebrate Canadians who know who to dream, create, contribute and achieve in many different areas. Winners will be acknowledged at the inaugural Top 50 Over 50 Awards Gala being held in Toronto in November 2017.

The recipients, and their stories, will serve as inspiration to others with a message that you’re never too old to make significant changes in your career or your life via reinvention, pursue a long-held dream or redefine what it means to be successful. These amazing stories will be publicly leveraged to help combat some of the ageism myths, like over 50 means over the hill, that still exist.

Success will be measured on a variety of criteria, including finding purpose, social change, innovation and inspiring others, by a panel of independent judges who have significant expertise and involvement within the 50+ category. Selected judges recognize the importance of these awards and will bring their objectivity and enthusiasm to this essential role.

For more information or to nominate someone go to:  http://www.ageworks.co

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Marylou Hilliard has over 25 years of advertising expertise and has earned a reputation as a brand champion. She has worked with a broad range of clients targeting an “ageing population” including the development of a new brand identity and design of several research reports for International Federation on Ageing and volunteer work for the Consumers Council of Canada and Psychologist Foundation of Canada.

Ann Hossack has held senior database marketing roles and has communicated effectively to consumer and business-to-business markets including those 50+ across a wide variety of industries. She believes that companies have yet to fully embrace this target group and is determined to promote the value of 50+ individuals as employees, entrepreneurs, volunteers or consumers.

Guest Blog: Entrepreneurship in Later Life, When Markets Are Ripe

By Mark Venning

Entrepreneurship in later life. At the risk of being prescriptive by way of writing a textbook definition of this venture, or you might say – adventure, I did learn early on that this movement would have legs as time went on. Gathering evidence of this, working directly in the front lines of the career development field since the mid-90’s, with a focus on entrepreneurship, it has been a privilege to help and encourage others to fulfill their goals while at the same time being realistic with people about keeping a healthy perspective on the challenges – reality bites as it were.

Let us not over inflate the trend bubble on this, the notion that suggests that legions of people over age 50 are breaking free to start and run a business, for it is not all it will turn out to be. From what I have observed, working with clients exploring this option, and for those who do it, the journey is often episodic in nature, and in addition to that, there are multiple variations of how people actually describe, design and construct their entrepreneurial story.

We must begin this discussion with understanding the motivations. Why do people in this rather large age zone (over 50), even want to consider this? As I often ask first, where are you on a scale from being – 1 (curious) to 5 (exploring) to 10 (real intent)? Not surprisingly, given the profile segmentations of the over 50’s, the responses tend to land somewhere in the middle.

What are those motivations?

Depending on the person’s situation at a given life stage, more than the actual age itself, the top responses are variations on three lines of thought:

  • can’t afford to retire, need/desire to supplement financial plans with earned income
  • too young to retire, need/desire to stay challenged or engaged
  • be my own boss, want flexibility, tired of working in the corporate environment

However, behind these statements, quite often there is a harboured wish to continue to look for a traditional job, hence the episodic nature of some entrepreneurial ventures. For example, it is not untypical for those who take the route of independent consulting to take on a full time position offered by a business client, and after a few years wander back to independence.

Probing people further in conversation, it turns out in many cases, that the word entrepreneurship sits very weighty on their minds, but when you turn it into a discussion of possibilities around “a range of self-employment options”, the explorer becomes more open minded.

What are those possibilities?

To start, I am keen to find out what ideas people already have in their heads. Sometimes several, though not always fully developed, these ideas fall under three general categories:

  • market my own expertise as an independent consultant or contractor
  • start a home based, web based business – product, service or craft
  • start a business or buy a franchise, build it to sell in a number of years

With the next two-part question: what is your specific business idea and to what extent have you determined that there is an obtainable market for it? …the answer is, “it’s a work in progress”.

Is there an obtainable market for you? That is a pretzel shaped question. On one twist, what differentiation, value and relevance to you bring to a given market, and the other twist is, what is the gap or unmet need in a market that you know you can serve?

While in discussions stemming from this question, I find that there are those who have little patience for the market research process and an under estimation of the ramp up period or timelines to get a business off and running. This is also accompanied by an under estimated realization that continuous life transitions as we age will require frequent recalibrations of business and personal goals.

Now there is another way forward where the possibilities can be several, simultaneously or sequentially, lived in the form of a portfolio of income streams. Interest or intent increases here as most people I have met, “explorers” of entrepreneurship in later life, have seen the merit in this model, because it can be modified over a longer period of later life stages. In that sense, this is a flexible, fluid from of self-employment, regenerative in process.

Enterprisers at any age

To re-frame this picture of entrepreneurship over the next decade, at whatever age we are, as market needs shift and traditional employment systems continue to reconstruct, it will require the curious, creative and collaborative mind-set of an enterpriser. We are all next decade enterprisers, and in a human service economy, there will be more need for social enterprisers at the same time as a renaissance for micro businesses, networked alliances & independent wide achievers, who like a da Vinci, learn to re-apply their talents to where the work meets the need.

Often spiffed up for marketing purposes by language like “seniorpreneur” or “boomerprenur”, we should note, that while entrepreneurial activity may have increased in this over 50 age group, the overall self-employment rate in Canada over the last several years has stayed constant at around 15.5 percent. At the same time with the continuum of demographic shifts in mind, the so named “generation X” is now entering their early 50’s and I don’t think they see themselves as seniors.

As we move into the next decade there is no reason to suspect that the exploration or intent level will diminish when it comes to entrepreneurship in later life, but two things will need to happen.

First, a healthier resource system to educate and support people will need to surface, one that demystifies the concept of entrepreneurship and makes it less about age and more about marketability. Second, more research is needed to understand the motivations, options, patterns and cycles of entrepreneurship or self-employment over a person’s life course.

__________________________________________________________________________________ Mark Venning works primarily with non-profit & business leaders offering insights and direction on the Business & Social Aspects of Aging Demographics and helps organizations adapt their thinking to meet the challenges of “recoding a longevity society” which include designing age inclusive communities and creating opportunities for inter-generational collaboration with an enterprising mind-set. www.changerangers.com

Guest Blog: Changing Patterns of Business Startups

By Adele Robertson

from-jane_4-2-oa140 years ago, the average life span in the Western world was 45 years old. In 2016, many Canadians can look forward to adding forty more years to that average. The question of leaving full time wage work at the typical “retirement” age of 65 is being scrutinized. 65 is the ‘new’ 75 or, even 80!

Today, even the word RETIRE is on the brink itself of being retired. The idea of a continued career, an encore career, finding other means of activity which generate income, is quickly being embraced by the boomer cohort. Why is this? Doesn’t the picture of the sunshine years, the endless golf games, and freedom 55 resonate with most people? Clearly not, should we believe many latest studies and, statistics.

One answer comes from a new book by Chris Farrell called “UNRETIREMENT, How Baby Boomers Are Changing the Way We Think About Work, Community and the Good Life”. Older people are starting businesses more than any other age group. The over 50’s often have a number of competitive advantages in the marketplace. Consider also the great lure of self employment; allowing for flexibility and control over your life…you are the boss!

There are myriad reasons for this economic and social turnabout. Obviously, one compelling factor is the wonderful health many enjoy. The US Center for Disease Control projects that the boomer group, (generally thought of as those born between 1948 and 1964), have an 84% average of “excellent health”. If you are healthy, why would you wish to settle down on the porch in the rocking chair?

The economic realities of the 21st Century translate into financial need for many individuals. They simply must continue to generate an income. 68% of Canadians will have no pension. Some individuals still have pensions that that income is insufficient to cover their normal and desired lifestyle. Even if there is not a pressing financial need, there is the reality of what to do with one’s time when your lifetime career ends. There are 2000 hours a year to fill when that job has ended. As well, changes in corporations often translate into downsizing leaving numerous people over 50 without a job.

Although Canadian statistics are quite difficult to isolate, the 2012 Stats Canada census determined that 49% of new Canadian businesses were started by people over the age of 50. Society is giving birth to a new phenomena: SENIORPRENEURISM. It is also known that this business demographic has doubled in recent years. When one realizes that small and medium business enterprises generate 97% of the economy, Seniorpreneurs are certainly a force to be reckoned with.

“A greater number of older workers may be self-employed in the future because the baby boomers will reach retirement with considerably more wealth and education than prior cohorts:, writes Rand Corporation economists. A Kauffmann Foundation report provides additional rationale for the rise in seniorpreneuers. Quite simply, older workers have skills, wisdom, experience, credibility, and key to many endeavours, they have developed superb networks. The various new technologies, notably the Internet and small business software, lower start up costs considerable. As well, those experienced workers desire to continue employment but they demand greater autonomy and flexibility. All of this can be obtained when you launch your own business.

Many individuals will relish the idea of an encore career which is self driven. At the same time, a cautionary tale suggests that older workers understand their motivations, their values and, their ability to absorb risk. Those risk avoidance individuals would be wise not to invest all their savings in a new venture, at an older age.

It is exciting that so many former seniors are retiring the world retire as they embark on often unique and innovative roles in their third life stage.

The Sheridan Centre for Elder Research is in an ideal position to be both a sounding board for would be seniorpreneuers and possibly, a physical and digital hub for cross current exchanges and programmes. We are currently, with the help of Sheridan student, Luisa Cardoza, carrying out preliminary research on the state of Canadian olderpreneurs. It is clear there is a vacuum in data and comprehensive research on the state of this activity in Canada. Much, much more is required to determine next steps. It is clear that substantial studies are in order and we plan to do just that in the near future.

____________________________________________________________________________ Adele Robertson is the CEO and Founder of V Generation and a Sheridan Centre for Elder Research advisory board member.